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Situation in West Bengal’s riot-hit Baduria town ‘tense but under control’

first_imgWhile the situation in Baduria in West Bengal’s North 24 Parganas remained tense but under control, the political slug-fest over the Governor Keshari Nath Tripathi ‘summoning’ Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee  and her subsequent reaction continued for the second consecutive day on Wednesday.Leader of the Trinamool Congress Legislature Party Partha Chatterjee said that the party has written to President Pranab Mukherjee and Home Minister Rajnath Singh expressing strong reservations to Governor’s call. “If the Governor does not express regret over the developments, we will be forced to take strong decision,” Mr. Chatterjee said, adding any attack on Ms. Banerjee will not be ignored.  “We did not expect the Governor to act beyond his Constitutional limitations,” he said.Defending the Governor, BJP State president Dilip Ghosh said that the Governor was within its rights to speak to the Chief Minster over the developments. He went on to say that it is Ms. Banerjee who should apologise for making the details of conversation between the two public. He also sought to know why the State delayed in seeking central forces.The Left Front has demanded that all-party meeting be convened on the situation in Baduria and Basirhat. Communist Party of India (Marxist) MP Modh Salim said that it is not a personal issues between the Chief Minister and Government but more important is that peace and amity be restored.With the TMC mounting its attack on the Governor, experts fear that the situation may create legislative bottle neck. “It is totally incumbent on the Centre on who will be the Governor and how long his or her term can be.  While there has been instances of rift between the Constitutional head, the Governor and head of the Government Chief Minister in the past there has been no instance when Chief Minister has held a press conference against Governor,” Biswanath Chakraborty, head of Department of Political Science, Rabindra Bharati University, said.  Meanwhile, with four companies of Border Security Force (BSF) there was a huge deployment of security forces in the strife-torn areas in State’s North 24 Parganas which has been on boil over the past few days over a Facebook post.Though the blockades have been lifted  shops and commercial establishment remained closed in Baduria and adjoining areas.  Prohibitory orders under Section 144  of CrPC have been imposed in the area.  Along with area domination the police and security forces are also making public announcements to maintain peace in the area.last_img read more

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Strict vigil as normalcy returns to Baduria

first_imgLife in West Bengal’s Baduria and surrounding areas, where communal clashes broke out over a Facebook post, returned to normal on July 6, 2017 with no fresh incidents of violence, a senior official said. Shops and markets reopened, bus services resumed and locals started coming out of their homes. However, internet services continued to be disrupted and paramilitary forces and police remained posted in the troubled area.“Everything is back to normal. There has been no report of any problem from anywhere in Baduria and its adjoining areas in Basirhat in North 24 Parganas district,” a senior official of the state home department told PTI. “We are keeping strict vigil so that nothing untoward happens here. Till then police postings here will continue,” he said.Baduria and its adjoining areas, including Keosha market, Banshtala, Ramchandrapur and Tentulia, witnessed a communal flare-up following a post by a youth on Facebook earlier this week. Though the youth was arrested, members of two communities clashed, set up road blockades, damaged shops and set fire to vehicles.To control the situation, the State government had to temporarily suspend internet services in the four police station areas of Basirhat, Baduria, Swarupnagar and Deganga to check the spread of rumours through social networking sites.Asked about when internet services would resume, the official said, “A thorough review of the situation will be done before a decision is taken in this matter.” Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee had said on July 5, 2017 that the situation in Baduria was “under control”. The clashes had triggered an unprecedented spat between her and Governor K N Tripathi, whom she accused of acting like “a BJP block president” and “threatening” her.DGP Surajit Kar Purakayasta has requested people to refrain from spreading hatred. “Those spreading rumours and indulging in hate posts and false propaganda shall not be spared. Please respect the law of the land. Malicious efforts to create divides and attempts to take law in own hands will be sternly dealt with. Please don’t heed rumours,” Purakayasta said.last_img read more

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Telangana militant killed in J&K had been counselled by police

first_imgMohammad Taufeeq (26), a Telangana resident who was killed along with two other suspected terrorists in Anantnag district of Jammu and Kashmir earlier this week, was counselled on several occasions by the State police. Taufeeq from Aswapuram in Bhadradri-Kothagudem district in Telangana went missing from the police radar about two-and-half-months ago, a senior Home Ministry official said.It is the first such case, at least in a decade, of a non-Kashmiri being killed in a police encounter in Kashmir Valley, the official said. The Telangana police have a counter-radicalisation policy by which persons inclined towards radical ideology are counselled with the help of experts and family members. Such persons are kept under surveillance. The official said the J&K police are investigating how Taufeeq reached the Kashmir Valley. “We are investigating how he got in touch with the militants, whether it was through social media or some other medium,” J&K DGP S.P. Vaid said.The other two militants who were killed with Taufeeq were identified as Eisa Fazli, a resident of Soura on the outskirts of Srinagar and Syed Owais Shafi of Anantnag.Social media accounts affiliated to both Islamic State and Ansar Ghazwat-ul Hind (AGuT) backed by Al-Qaeda, claimed the three militants belonged to their outfits.An analysis of the social media posts revealed there was a scramble among the two outfits to claim that the militants were their members.On March 14, a day after the three were killed in an encounter, AGuT released the first ever issue of Al-Nasr, a propaganda pamphlet, describing them as “martyrs.” “Responding to the call of martyrdom, Mohammad Taufeeq started his jihadi journey in 2017 after making hijrah from India’s Hyderabad city to the mountains of Kashmir and was among the first in the ranks of Ansar Ghazwatul Hind,” the social media post said. It also carried a picture of Taufeeq with Mohammad Rehan, the latter identified as deputy Ameer (head) of the AGuT.Hours later, Islamic State Khorasan Province (ISKP), active in Afghanistan, released a statement that they were the soldiers of the IS. “The three soldiers of IS fulfilled their promise of martyrdom in Kashmir. We are proud of these martyrs’ character because they in a region, where India and Pakistan are playing a murky game,” the IS message said. Till last month, the J&K police claimed it was Fazli, who was pushing messages on media of the IS claiming two attacks in the Valley.“Since both outfits are claiming the militants to be their members, there seems to be a competition between the two. It is not good for the Kashmir Valley. Whether it’s Al-Qaeda or transnational jihadi organisations, they have destroyed half of the world. It will not be good for Kashmir,” said Mr. Vaid.last_img read more

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Bypoll defeat a lesson for us: Yogi Adityanath

first_imgUttar Pradesh Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath said on Saturday that over-confidence led to the BJP’s defeat in the Phulpur and Gorakhpur by-polls.“Overconfidence and inability to assess the ground realities during the last few days of campaigning turned the things against us in Gorakhpur and Phulpur Lok Sabha bypolls,” he told the Zee India Conclave. “The outcome of the by-elections is a lesson for us. But there are places where BJP has won for the first time.”Replying to a question on the formation of the third front he said: “The third front in U.P. is not a new phenomenon. Who’s the leader of this new SP-BSP alliance?”last_img read more

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Kashmir weave

first_imgKashmir silk was renowned to be finer than the Chinese weave till the thread broke in the vicissitudes of time. But there is hope now. The Government Silk Factory spanning Rajbagh and Solina in Srinagar is reopening, with the Word Bank granting ₹23.54 crore to infuse new life into its filatures and looms.From 200 looms in its heyday, only 26 remain. The floods in 2014 dealt the final blow. “The deluge damaged the looms and stocks,” Muhammad Afzal, factory manager, says. Encroachments have shrunk the site from 13.5 acres to 3 acres.The British opened the factory in 1896, taking Kashmir into the industrial era. By 1939, the factory, working round the clock with 2,000 workers, used to churn out 20,000 metres of silk a month. But protests had broken out against the Dogra monarchy over the poor condition of the artisans and the tough laws on weavers. The factory suspended operations for some time in 1917. Muhammad Iqbal, poet, visited Kashmir in June 1921 and wrote the famous Persian poem Saqi Nama on the ordeal of the weavers. In 1924, the workers launched a full-fledged agitation against low wages, but the rulers crushed the protest.“The revival of the project should be seen not only as an effort to step up silk production but also as a memory project,” says Tassaduq Mufti, Peoples Democratic Party leader and former State Tourism Minister. Mufti, a Bollywood cinematographer-turned-politician, backed the idea of reviving the silk factory as “a living memory”. The revival plan envisages generating 10 lakh metres of silk a year from the Rajbagh and Solina unit and those at Nowshera and Bari Brahmana in the State.As silk production grew phenomenally elsewhere, Srinagar’s silk factory failed to compete in the international market and saw a declining number of customers, especially high-spending Europeans. Now is the time for another stab at glory.Text by Peerzada Ashiq and images by Nissar Ahmad(Peerzada is a Special Correspondent and Nissar a Senior Special News Photographer of The Hindu based in Srinagar)last_img read more

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M.P. Ministers want CM to withdraw cases against them

first_imgThe decision of the newly elected Congress government in Madhya Pradesh to withdraw “politically motivated” cases lodged against party workers, farmers and social activists during the 15-year rule of the BJP in the State has prompted the elected representatives (MLAs and MPs) to demand similar measures in cases registered against them.According to sources, two State Ministers — Minister for Sports and Youth Welfare and Higher Education Jitu Patwari and Minister Civil Supplies and Consumer Protection Pradhumn Singh Tomar — brought the cases lodged against them to the notice of Chief Minister Kamal Nath after the Cabinet decision on Thursday to develop a mechanism to withdraw “politically motivated” cases against party workers, farmers and activists.Mr. Nath assured the two Ministers that the cases against them will be considered when they come for trial in special courts in the near future, the sources added. The M.P. government has decided to set up district and State-level committees to examine cases against party workers, activists and farmers lodged in the last 15 years.last_img read more

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ScienceShot: Mysterious Meltback Explained?

first_imgThis glacier wasn’t supposed to shrink. In the late 1800s, retreating glaciers throughout the Alps marked the end of a centuries-long cold spell that climatologists have dubbed the Little Ice Age. Austria’s Hintereis Glacier (above), which retreated more than 1 kilometer between 1860 and 1930, is one of the most dramatic examples. But the meltback has bewildered researchers for decades. Weather data from that era, including trends in precipitation, suggest that glaciers in the area should have been expanding, or at least holding their ground. Indeed, at that time elsewhere in the world, glaciers were advancing, and carbon dioxide concentrations hadn’t risen enough to strongly affect global climate. Now, researchers have come up with a possible explanation for the curious shrinkage: It’s as simple as soot. By darkening the insulating layer of snow over the glacier and causing it to melt earlier each year, soot exposed glacial ice to the sun’s melting rays for a longer period every summer, they explain. Layers of ice in the upper reaches of glaciers provide a year-by-year chronicle of soot emitted by local industry and by the coal and wood burned to heat homes in the valleys nearby. In many places, these emissions more than doubled between the 1850s and the 1880s. The researchers combined that data with modern weather patterns to estimate the amount of soot deposited on glaciers in the 1800s.  According to their models, soot could have caused about 1 meter’s worth of additional ice melt each year despite cool temperatures and steady precipitation, they report today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. By 1900, increased emissions of soot could have triggered the loss of more than 15 m of ice from a glacier’s surface; by 1930, the loss could have totaled 30 m or more—magnitudes and timing that can easily account for the Alpine glacial retreat, the scientists contend.See more ScienceShots.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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ScienceShot: How Is a Dinosaur Like a Rooster?

first_imgWhat got female duck-billed dinosaurs in the mood to make baby dinos? Perhaps it was something never before seen in the fossil record: a sexually suggestive fleshy comb, like that of roosters, on the head and neck of males. A mummified specimen of the duckbill Edmontosaurus regalis, discovered by an international team in the west-central region of Canada’s Alberta province, proudly preserves just such a structure (shown above in artist’s reconstruction). The team, which reports the find online today in Current Biology, points out that some duckbills had bony crests on their heads, which are easily preserved in fossil form, and that researchers had suggested functions for such crests ranging from sexual display to external olfactory organs. But E. regalis, a so-called flat-headed duckbill, does not have a hard, bony crest, making this first discovery of a soft tissue version all the more important for understanding dino behavior. Because birds evolved from dinosaurs, and the combs of roosters and other birds are widely considered to be for sexual display, the team concludes that this is also the most likely explanation for its presence in some duckbills.See more ScienceShots.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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Video: Large animals are no whiz at peeing

first_imgAn elephant’s bladder is more than 3000 times the size of a cat’s, yet the two animals take the same amount of time to urinate. That’s the surprising conclusion of a study previously released on the arXiv preprint server and set for publication this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Videos shot of a range of different mammals reveal that, as long as the animals are larger than 3 kilograms, they take approximately 21 seconds to empty their bladders. To find out why, the researchers measured how quickly the urine flowed from their urethras. As an animal’s body size increases, so does the length of its urethra. Because an elephant’s urethra is longer than a cat’s, for example, gravity creates more pressure in the elephant’s urethra, pushing the urine through faster. The rule doesn’t hold for small animals like rats and bats, which take only 0.1 to 2 seconds to urinate. Their urethras are so thin that gravity doesn’t affect the flow of urine. Instead, surface tension pulls the urine through the urethra until it emerges in droplets (as in the video above). The researchers hope that their findings will help engineers build larger systems of pipes and reservoirs that don’t take as long to drain.(Video credit: Kenneth Breuer and Sharon Swartz, Brown University)Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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Apple May Start Making iPhone 6S Plus in India to Slash Its Prices

first_imgApple may start iPhone 6S Plus production at a new factory in southern India to lower the model’s price, local media outlet The Economic Times reported today. It may start manufacturing in Bengaluru, formerly known as Bangalore, in two weeks.By setting up a local factory, Apple aims to slash Indian iPhone prices, as a response to government policies that tax foreign phones. India’s government raised tariffs on smartphones from 15 to 20 percent in February, forcing Apple to seek new measures to drop its prices and stay competitive.Read it at The Verge Related Itemslast_img read more

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The Death Penalty Ordinance Only Serves to Worsen India’s Extradition Problem

first_imgIn 1991, a Goan orphanage was discovered to be the site of horrific and systemic sexual abuse of young children. Freddy Peats was running an orphanage called Gurukul in Margao in South Goa, from where innumerable pictures were discovered of over two thousand children being abused.Further investigation led the police to discover a gang of six foreign nationals who would routinely visit Peats’ orphanage and sexually abuse children. They were Zell Jurgen Andreas from Germany, Werner Wulf Ingo, an Australian citizen, Eoghan McBride from New Zealand, Nils Oscar Johnson, a Swedish national, Raymond Varley from Britain and Dominique Sebire from France.Read it at The Wire Related Itemslast_img read more

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Extradition Pleas Pending, Sterling Biotech Case Key Accused Leaves UAE

first_imgThwarting efforts by Indian agencies to have him extradited from the UAE where he had been detained, Nitin Jayantilal Sandesara, the owner of Gujarat-based Sterling Biotech group and a key accused in a Rs 5,300-crore bank loan fraud, is believed to have left the Emirates.Read it at Indian Express Related Itemslast_img

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