Tag: 上海后花园

Report: Greg Papa switching from 95.7 The Game to KNBR

first_imgAlmost six months after becoming the 49ers’ new radio play-by-play announcer, Greg Papa is reportedly joining the team’s flagship station.As of Friday, Papa is no longer working with 95.7 The Game, where he’s hosted an afternoon talk show for years, sources told The Athetic’s Steve Berman. Papa is switching channels to join KNBR 680 for an undisclosed sports talk show slot.Bonta Hill, who was Papa’s co-host for the daily noon-3 p.m. show on 95.7, said on Twitter he was blindsided by Friday’s …last_img read more

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2009 – the Year of Natural Fibres

first_imgCotton is grown successfully in South Africa.(Image: Cotton SA) The first sale of imported angorastud goats took place in Graaff-Reinetin 1857. (Image: Graaff-Reinet)Janine ErasmusThe Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) of the United Nations has declared 2009 to be the International Year of Natural Fibres. South Africa’s Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, an organisation that has a large stake in the country’s budding natural fibre industry, is backing the initiative.The International Year of Natural Fibres (IYNF) covers a wide range of natural fibres of both animal and vegetable origin, with uses ranging from traditional and non-traditional industrial products to fabrics with glamorous apparel.Plant fibres are obtained from the fruit, stem or leaf, and include cotton (fruit), flax, jute, kenaf, bamboo and hemp (stems), and sisal and agave (leaf). Fibres of animal origin are derived from hair or secretions. The former category includes wool, alpaca, camel hair, mohair from the Angora goat, angora wool from the Angora rabbit, and cashmere. The latter category includes silk.Tree fibres are not covered by the IYNF, but will be one focus of the 2011 International Year of Forests.Improving the global natural fibre industryThe FAO adopted resolution number 189 announcing the IYNF on 20 December 2006 at the 60th session of the United Nations General Assembly in Rome. The organisation expects the year-long initiative to contribute greatly to the global Millennium Development Goals by improving these industries that provide a livelihood for millions of people in some of the world’s poorest countries.More than 30-million tons of natural fibre, worth some R300-billion ($30-billion), are produced annually; cotton and wool are the main products. In some developing nations, natural fibres add significantly to the economy, such as cotton in certain West African countries, jute in Bangladesh and sisal in Tanzania.The objectives of the IYNF are to raise awareness of the economic and environmental importance of natural fibres, stimulate demand for these goods, and promote the efficiency and sustainability of the natural fibre industries.The FAO also hopes to enlist the help of governments to address problems faced by natural fibre industries and to foster solid international partnerships for research and fair trade among the various industries. All of these factors are intended to improve the lives of small farmers around the world.The IYNF will be celebrated through conferences, exhibitions, and fashion shows in many countries, including an International Mohair Summit – the first such gathering ever – in November 2009 in South Africa. The country produces over 54% of the world’s mohair, and according to the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) it is also the best quality mohair available.Endless possibilitiesThe CSIR has an entire research group dedicated to the study of natural fibres. The great variety of natural fibres presents endless possibilities, all of which are just waiting to be harnessed, according to research group leader Sunshine Blouw.The CSIR focuses on finding interesting and novel uses for age-old natural fibres, and on ways to improve their properties. The organisation also studies and develops natural fibre-reinforced composite materials for use in the building, automobile and aerospace industries. A composite material comprises two dissimilar components, such as plywood and concrete, which form a new material with better properties when mixed.Finally, the CSIR investigates better planting and harvesting methods as well as the best strategies to sustain the various natural fibre industries. Much of the research centres on non-woven fibres.Other areas of research involve processing of fibre (preparation, spinning, winding, weaving and knitting technologies), fibre modification (changing the properties of fibre) and clothing technologies (enhancing comfort, sizing, fit and automation processes). This research will enable the South African clothing and textile industries to become more competitive globally.The CSIR’s contribution to the IYNF, says Blouw, will include an educational series on the different fibres available in South Africa, including mohair, wool, agave, African wild silk, hemp, flax, cotton, cashmere, sisal, pineapple leaves and natural fibre composites.“We plan to make the natural fibre series informative and educational,” adds Blouw. “It would be ideal for use in the classroom as well as by anyone who would like to know more about the fibres itself, what South Africa’s position is with regard to the rest of the world and what the CSIR is doing with its research to assist our industries.”Innovative uses of natural fibresIn South Africa there are a number of lucrative natural fibre industries, such as that of Agave americana – better known as the plant used in the manufacture of tequila. The agave is indigenous to Mexico and was introduced to the dry Karoo region of South Africa a century ago, where it adapted readily.Strict legislation prohibits the manufacture of tequila from agave harvested anywhere but in the Mexican states of Jalisco, Guanajuato, Mlchoacan, Nayarit or Tamaulipas. However, South African-harvested agave is used for other purposes. Besides the traditional products of twine or carpets, fibres from the blue-grey leaves are well suited for use in the automotive industry in composite materials, or in the geotextile industry, where permeable materials are used to strengthen soil or improve its drainage properties.A CSIR-driven agave project is underway on a 1 000ha plot near Graaff-Reinet. The project will investigate harvesting, spinning and weaving of fibre and will help to develop these skills in local communities.Another promising component of South Africa’s natural fibre industry, especially amongst subsistence farmers, features cashmere, made from the soft, dense undercoat of goats. South Africa’s indigenous goat population, kept for their meat, milk and skin products, numbers around 6.3-million. Many of these local breeds, such as Savannah and Boer, are capable of producing a fine cashmere, according to the CSIR – but over the years the focus has been rather on the overcoat while the undercoat has been all but ignored.CSIR research has revealed that the local goat population is of a good enough quality for the establishment of a sustainable cashmere industry. The next step is to implement pilot projects in goat-rich areas, which will focus on selective breeding and cashmere-refining technologies.Hemp and wild silkThe CSIR is conducting research on industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L. subsp. sativa var. sativa) fibres to find more uses for it in composites. Hemp is showing great potential as an environmentally-friendly alternative for the use of glass fibres in engineering composites.While it is related to the plant from which marijuana is made, hemp contains no tetrahydrocannabinol, the active ingredient in marijuana. Sadly, it has been neglected because of its relation to the psychoactive drug. Hemp fibres are similar to those obtained from flax and jute. They are used in textiles, cordage and fine paper products, and the woody core can also be used for animal bedding, garden mulch, fuel and a range of building materials.The CSIR is also involved in a wild silk project in the North West province. Wild silk is obtained not from the silkworm but from the non-edible wild moth species Gonimbrasia postica and rufobrunnea. The organisation has undertaken wild silk research since 1991, with an emphasis on the quality of the silk fibre, skills transfer, and the creation of a viable market for the silk.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Contact Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.Related articlesGoing wild over indigenous silkUseful linksCouncil for Scientific and Industrial ResearchInternational Year of Natural FibresUnited Nations resolution number 1892009 Mohair SummitCotton SAMohair SAlast_img read more

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South Africa, Japan sign investment pact

first_img20 February 2013 The Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) and the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ Ltd, Japan’s largest bank, have signed a memorandum of understanding to collaborate on increasing Japanese investment into South Africa. The agreement also seeks to increase South African-Japanese cooperation in various areas, including platinum beneficiation and transport infrastructure. The signing follows a visit to Japan by Trade and Industry Minister Rob Davies last year, and comes ahead of President Jacob Zuma planned state visit to Japan in June. The agreement was signed in Pretoria on Tuesday by Trade and Industry Deputy Director-General Pumla Ncapayi and Muneo Kurauchi, senior managing executive director at the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ Ltd. Kurauchi said it was “a pleasure to sign the agreement”, adding that Africa was “a promising area for Japanese companies”.Taking SA, Japan relations ‘to the next level’ Speaking to SAnews after the signing, Trade and Industry Director-General Lionel October said the agreement, which would be assessed on an annual basis, was key to taking the relationship between South Africa and Japan to a higher level. He said South Africa had seen an increase in Japanese investment into the country, citing Toyota as an example of one of the companies that had invested and grown its business in the country. “We now want to expand, using South Africa as the base into the African continent,” October said. “We want to cooperate in terms of exports into the continent as a joint venture between South Africa and Japanese companies.”Platinum beneficiation projects Regarding cooperation in platinum beneficiation, October noted that the government was looking to set up two new Special Economic Zones (SEZs), one in North West and one in Limpopo province, “to beneficiate platinum into fuel cells, platinum coins and jewellery, etc. “The Japanese are the world leaders in platinum beneficiation, so we are hoping to cooperate on that.” Feasibility studies on the two SEZs would begin in the next few weeks, October said. The agreement also looks at technical assistance and financial support for rail and infrastructure projects. This comes as President Zuma takes the lead in championing the African Union’s North-South Corridor Project, which is a road and rail link from Dar Es Salaam in Tanzania to Durban. “There are about 350 projects in there,” October said. Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

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Google Launches SMS-Based Services for Africa

first_imgRelated Posts What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … frederic lardinois Tags:#Google#mobile#news#NYT#web Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfacescenter_img Google today announced a number of SMS-based services for the African market. Google SMS provides access to information by SMS (news, local weather, sports, agriculture tips, etc.), while Google Trader is an SMS-based marketplace where buyers and sellers can connect. Google SMS Tips is a query-and-answer service that can take any free-form text query, find the keywords, and then identify and return a relevant answer from a large database. As Google points out, Africa has the world’s highest mobile growth rate and mobile phone penetration is far higher than Internet penetration. By focusing on SMS-based service, Google will be able to reach a far larger number of potential users than by working on web-based apps. Just for Uganda at First Even though Google stresses that it targets ‘Africa’ with these services, in reality, they are only available for users on MTN Uganda‘s network, but chances are that, if successful, Google will expand these offerings in the future.Google worked together with MTN Uganda, the Grameen Foundation‘s “AppLab,” and a number of other local partners to get this service off the ground. Fighting Information PovertyIn a post on the Google Africa blog about this launch, Rachel Payne, Google’s Country Manager in Uganda points out that the company believes that “it’s important to reach users wherever they are, with the information they need most, and in areas with the greatest information poverty.” It will be interesting to see how (and if) local users will make use of these new services. SMS TipsAmong these new services, Google SMS and Google Trader are very interesting and will definitely be quite useful for a lot of users. Google SMS Tips seems to be the most sophisticated of these services, as it interprets search queries and doesn’t just return a list of links, but actually tries to compute the query and return a relevant answer to a question. For now, SMS Tips works best with health questions and queries related to farming (including weather information). Even if you are not in Uganda, you can give the service a try here (query form is at the bottom of the page) The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagementlast_img read more

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Note To BBC: The Future Of Radio Is Not “This Content Is Not Available On Your Device”

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#New Media#web Related Posts For a media organization founded in the 1920s, the British Broadcasting Corporation has done a remarkable job of keeping up with the times. Its iPlayer media app is adored by those fortunate enough to have access to it. This week, the BBC launched an iPlayer spinoff that focuses on radio. It’s a great start, but if you’re eagerly awaiting radio’s future, you might want to hang tight.To be fair, iPlayer Radio is a solid offering. The attractively designed Web app is a focused way to stream live broadcasts from any of the BBC’s many channels. There’s a ton of content here, both live and archived. It’s all broken down by channel, category, schedule and – as you drill down further – topic area, personality, format and music genre. It’s a handy online portal into the BBC’s radio experience, much of which is available to users around the world.Geography is where the concept starts to fizzle. I live in the United States, so there are limitations on what I can hear on iPlayer Radio. For one thing, the iOS apps aren’t available here, so I have no choice but to point my iPhone and iPad browsers to the Web app. To the BBC’s credit, streaming a live broadcast works fairly well, and I can minimize the browser, launch another app and continue to listen uninterrupted. But even in the browser, I’m blocked from streaming certain shows in the archive. Bummer. I don’t know precisely what the future of radio looks like, but I’m pretty sure it doesn’t include the sentence, “This content is not available on your device.”As well designed as the Web app is, it still feels a little fractured. Not all the audio content on iPlayer Radio is funneled to the same pop-up window, for example. Some of it plays natively in the browser tab in which you initiate the stream, while some of it launches a new player in pop-up window. If you’re already streaming from one of those pop-ups and then decide to switch to another channel, iPlayer Radio will fire up another pop-up. In many cases, you end up with concurrent streams of audio, which turn into a cacophonous trainwreck of sound until you manage to find one of the stop buttons. It’s weird.To improve this particular aspect of the user experience, the BBC might want to borrow a page from SoundCloud or Shuffler.fm, both of which feature a single universal audio player that keeps streaming no matter where you navigate and then switches to a new audio stream when you ask for it. Other bastions of radio innovation have good ideas as well – NPR, Stitcher Radio, TuneIn and Pandora come to mind.The BBC might be, as radio futurologist James Cridland put it, a bit late to the party on this, but it’s a valiant effort, on the whole. The BBC has some incredibly high-quality content, often containing deeply valuable, alternative viewpoints. This new initiative helps open it up to a wider global audience. The mobile apps (from what I can tell) look especially well designed, with innovative carousel navigation and an alarm to wake up to the BBC. It’s the mobile experience that has the greatest potential to steer radio’s future, especially as smartphones continue to find a place in cars.It’s worth noting that iPlayer Radio is only the player’s first iteration. The BBC knows that online streaming and mobile technology are going to be a central component of their future. It will be interesting to see how it unfolds. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market john paul titlowlast_img read more

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3 Best Fun-Loving Fall Games: WoW: Mists of Pandaria, Borderlands 2, Tokyo Jungle

first_imgAn Unhinged-Yet-Refined Shooter: Borderlands 2On paper, nothing about Borderlands 2 should be noteworthy. It’s a first-person shooter, and a sequel at that. But like its predecessor, Borderlands 2 embraces the addictive playability of its genre, opting to focus on fun rather than dressing things up with an overdone, overwrought war-zone setting.The result is a game that doesn’t take itself one bit seriously — and that’s refreshing. Borderlands 2 is about killing lots (and lots) of things, and stockpiling lots and lots guns. Simple as that. The sequel smooths out the rough patches of its predecessor and mixes in an array of open-world environments to explore, all populated by a cast of hilariously deranged locals, of course. With genuinely funny dialogue and a cartoony cel-shaded look that’s a refreshing departure from the genre’s penchant for drab hyperrealism, Borderlands 2 is as addictive as it is earnest. Summer is over, and new video games are springing forth at long last. But in an industry happy to rake in cash with some tried-and-trite formulas, “new” doesn’t exactly translate into “fun” or “worth sixty bucks.”Whether you’re a hard-core gamer or just a homebody looking for a hobby more engaging than Court TV, a truly great game can be an immersive way to sneak in a little play in the cooler months. Ditch uninspired sequels and games Gorilla-glued to genre conventions with this starter set of new fall titles that stay true to the good, (mostly) clean fun that gaming is all about. The Best Online RPG, Now With Pandas — WoW: Mists of PandariaIf you’ve never waded into World of Warcraft, the advent of a new expansion pack is the perfect time to dive in. The huge open-world online role-playing game has 10 million subscribers for a reason, and Mists of Pandaria improves on its successful formula — no small feat for a game that’s been around since 2004.Mists of Pandaria is the most playful expansion to the game to date, adding a playable race of epicurean pandas (this race has its origins in an April Fool’s joke), a pokemon-esque game within a game, and a brand new class of martial-arts masters. There’s never a dull moment in WoW — it doesn’t hurt that developer Blizzard religiously irons out the kinks in weekly updates — and Mists of Pandaria is just another excellent entry point to a game truly worthy of its immense hype. taylor hatmaker 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… Tags:#borderlands 2#gaming#pandaria#review#tokyo jungle#World of Warcraft#WoW Related Posts 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App Surviving The Post-Apocalypse As A Beagle: Tokyo JungleTokyo Jungle’s premise is absolutely ridiculous, and that’s half the charm of a game that you might be powerless to resist. An absurd departure from the zombie-crowded genre of survival gaming, Tokyo Jungle sets you loose in a post-apocalyptic version of the Japanese metropolis. But rather than roaming as some scrappy, gun-toting human you’re playing a critter … or rather, as a lot of critters.You’ll be everything from a golden retriever to a velociraptor while fighting to stay alive in a dinosaur-eat-dog world. Naturally, it’s easier said than done, requiring some fun strategizing to make the most of the beast you inhabit.The game isn’t perfect but it’s an enjoyable, challenging gaming holiday from yet another zombie slog.These games thrive on not taking themselves too seriously. Have another fun, irreverent fall game? Let me know in the comments and maybe we’ll take it for a spin. last_img read more

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Plaxico Burress Took A Twitter Jab At Jim Harbaugh, Michigan

first_imgPlaxico Burress close up.plaxico burress upset michigan state nebraska gameSince taking over at Michigan, Jim Harbaugh has certainly gone above and beyond in terms of recruiting. Whether it’s sleepovers, climbing trees, going to class with recruits or moving spring practice to Florida for a week, Harbaugh is committed to selling his vision in any way possible.The future is Harbaugh’s biggest selling point, as the Wolverines haven’t been elite lately. In recent years, Michigan has been on the short end of the stick against arch-rivals Michigan State and Ohio State. They’ve lost 11 of 12 to the Buckeyes and seven of eight to Sparty. Taking all this into account, former Michigan State star Plaxico Burress dropped a quick jab at Harbaugh and his recruiting tactics on Twitter this morning. According to Burress, while Harbaugh has to peddle his program, the Spartans simply have to point to the results. Looks like J Harbaugh is pulling out all stops to get kids to Michigan. We @MSU_Football just believe in the product. Don’t have to sell us— Plaxico Burress (@plaxicoburress) March 1, 2016Plax has a point because Michigan State has been the premier program in the state of Michigan the last several seasons. However, Harbaugh did lead his team to a 10-3 record in his first year and was one insane fluke play away from beating the Spartans. The Wolverines also have an outstanding recruiting class on the way.Will the Maize and Blue begin dominating its in-state rivals starting in 2016? We won’t go that far, but this series should be much closer in the coming years.last_img read more

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During suicide debate Justice Minister says its time for First Nations to

first_imgBy Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsJustice Minster Jody Wilson-Raybould said Tuesday the Trudeau Liberal government aims to “complete the unfinished business of Confederation” and replace the Indian Act with a “reconciliation framework” that would outlast the life of this administration.Wilson-Raybould didn’t lead the government side in an emergency debate held late into the night which was triggered by a suicide crisis gripping the small fly-in community of Attawapiskat in Ontario’s James Bay region. Yet, her speech was the only one that revealed the extent of the historical vision the Trudeau government has when it comes to reshaping the relationship between the state and the original inhabitants on this land.The Liberals aim to do nothing less than scrap the Indian Act. In its place the government wants to create a new relationship based on section 35 of the Constitution, which guarantees Aboriginal rights, and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), according to Wilson-Raybould.“We need to ensure we breathe life into section 35 and that we complete the unfinished business of Confederation,” said Wilson-Raybould. “If we do so we will have a strong and appropriate governance in First Nation communities wherein they have moved beyond the Indian Act.”For about five-and-a-half hours on Tuesday evening, the House of Commons, the centre of political life in Canada, turned its full attention to the dark and painful suicide epidemic that seems to cycle through northern First Nation communities.The latest is Attawapiskat which declared a state of emergency Saturday after recording 11 suicide attempts in a 24-hour period.NDP MP Charlie Angus, whose riding includes Attawapiskat, called for the debate to not only discuss the Cree community, but also similar tragedies that have hit other First Nation communities: Pimicikamak Cree Nation which declared a state of emergency last month after suffering six suicides and 140 attempts in the span of two months and La Loche, Sask., a Dene community that suffered a school shooting that left four dead in January.Wilson-Rayboud, a former regional chief for the Assembly of First Nations, who is now the country’s top lawyer, wove her own life experience and political track record in a speech that traced the roots of the suicide crisis to the 140-year-old Indian Act. Her speech laid out the thinking behind much of the symbolism and language the Trudeau government has employed whenever it communicates about the relationship between Indigenous peoples and the Canadian state.“I am proud to be an Indigenous person and stand up in this honourable house and speak to this important issue,” she said. “Indigenous peoples in this country are at an important junction in our history as they seek to deconstruct their colonial legacy and rebuild their communities….Only the colonized can decolonize themselves and change is not easy.”Wilson-Raybould then attacked the Indian Act.“It is not easy to remove the shackles of 140 years of life under the Indian Act. Our government, and I hope all members of this honourable house, is committed to ensuring, in partnership with Indigenous peoples, to do just that,” she said. “For Attawapiskat and for all First Nations, the Indian Act is not a suitable system of government, it is not consistent with the rights enshrined in our constitution, the principles as set out in (UNDRIP) or calls to action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report. In addition to the need for social and economic support, urgently needed in Attawapiskat and all First Nations, all Indigenous peoples need to be empowered to take back control of their own lives.”Then, Wilson-Raybould described the scale of the project as nothing short of historical in a portion of her speech addressed directly to Indigenous peoples.“Indigenous peoples, the challenge is not easy, it is complex, indeed for far too long it has been ignored as a task as too difficult and monumental, but we can and must do better. This work is non-partisan, it is broader than the department of Justice and did not just fall to the department of Indigenous and Northern Affairs,” she said. “The nation-to-nation relationship is one of the most challenging public policy issues of our time and I challenge all members of this House to work with us in building this relationship. There are no quick fixes to these issues, a substantive nation-to-nation discussion with Indigenous peoples is needed. We need to sit down and work jointly to ensure Indigenous communities are strong and healthy and in charge and in control of their own destiny.”There were about 20 NDP MPs, from a caucus of 44, in the chamber during the debate at various points, and about 50 Liberal MPs from a caucus of 184. The Conservatives had the lowest number attend, with about five scattered throughout their party’s 98-seat section in the House of Commons. Their numbers jumped to 11 when their Aboriginal affairs critic Cathy McLeod stood up for her turn in the debate and most sat around her for the benefit of the House of Commons camera.When the debate began, MPs from all sides said they wanted Tuesday night to be a turning point, the debate to finally end the debates about another crisis crippling another First Nation.Angus compared the current suicide crisis as Canada’s “Alan Kurdi” moment, referring to the image of the body of the three-year-old Syrian refugee child who drowned in September after a failed attempt to reach Europe.“It shocked the world,” said Angus, who triggered the emergency debate. “This is our moment….Tonight might be the beginning of a change in our country and that is what I am asking us to come together to do.”Angus’ voice, with emotion seeping in at the edges, read out messages from First Nation youths he recently received, including the words of Abigail Mattinas, from Constance Lake First Nation, who said she wanted to bring “light in a dark time.”NDP MP Georgina Jolibois spoke after Angus and said suicide attempts were starting to rise in La Loche, which sits in her riding, as a result of the January shooting. Jolibois said youth were not getting the help they needed. She said many youth were showing signs of post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of the shooting.“But they have no one to turn to and nowhere to go,” she said. “The families are left alone on their own to mend for themselves and take care of their problems…Young people, children and their families when they are feeling the effects of PTSD they need to go to the health centre or the band office or clinic and say I need to speak to someone because I am feeling stressed and overwhelmed. They walk in and there is no one to talk to them.”Health Minister Jane Philpott said during the debate that she believed those supports should still be there in La Loche, but would discuss the issue with Jolibois. She said the Liberal government would this year be investing $300 million in mental health and wellness in Indigenous communitiesPhilpott began her Commons speech with the data: First Nation male youth suicide rates are 10 times higher than male non-Indigenous youth; First Nation female youth suicide rates are 21 times than their non-Indigenous counterparts; Inuit male youth rates are 35 times higher than their Canadian counterparts.“It is a staggering reality, it is completely unacceptable,” she said. “When I think there are communities in our country where young people as young as my young 15-year-old daughter and even younger than that, when there are young people in groups are decided that there is no hope their future, we must do better…tonight has to be a turning point for us as a country.”Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett, who was praised for her passion by MPs during the debate, became emotional as she recounted her last trip to Attawapiskat when she was an in opposition and the community was in the midst of a housing crisis.“I was thinking of my trip to Attawapiskat in one of those terrible homes and seeing this 10-month-old baby on the bed and just thinking that that baby can’t pay for whatever else is going on around, that baby deserves a chance,” said Bennett.Bennett, who at one point referred to herself as the “minister of reconciliation,” said “these communities need hope” and the children need to know “they are valued and have value.” Bennett said she was hoping by the end of the debate that all Canadians would lift these communities up.“Suicide is not a consequence of individual vulnerability,” she said. “It is about the causes of the causes.”She then listed many of the causes of the causes, including racism, Indian residential schools, colonialization, child abuse, over-crowded houses, lack of health services, lack of clean water and healthy food.“There is no single answer to addressing this,” said Bennett.In her speech, Bennett also discussed the child welfare system, “where we have more children in care than at the height of residential schools.” She also raised the issue of child abuse.“We have to talk out loud about that now,” said Bennett, referring to an Anglican priest who abused 500 children in Ontario’s James Bay region.“This is 20 years of abuse in that region,” she said. “This is not difficult to understand, to make the links.”The Conservatives took a different tack. While for a moment it seemed that the party’s Aboriginal affairs critic Cathy McLeod would continue to focus on the suicide crisis facing First Nations by recounting her first week on the job as a nurse in a First Nation community facing three suicides, she eventually shifted gears.“Moving back from the First Nation Transparency Act is a terrible disservice to band members,” said MacLeod.The Transparency Act was passed by the Stephen Harper government which forced band councils to publicly release their financial information. While the Act has not been repealed, the Liberal government has pulled back from court action to force non-complying First Nations to release the information.The issue was raised repeatedly by Conservative MPs during the debate.“To me this is a critical one step,” said McLeod. “We shine the light for communities to actually look at their leadership and what their leadership is doing.”MacLeod also said her party remained unapologetic about refusing, while in government, to move forward with $1.9 billion in education investment after First Nation chiefs refused to support accompanying legislation.“There should be some equal work done, not only is there money, but we are going to create a structure that is going achieve results we want to achieve,” she said, responding to a question from Edmonton NDP MP Linda Duncan.However, long-time Nova Scotia MP Bill Casey, who left the Conservatives and ran under the Liberal banner in the last election, summed up the sentiment of many MPs present in the House of Commons throughout the evening.“I was elected 28 years ago for the first time,” said Nova Scotia Liberal MP Bill Casey. “One of the first debates we had was this debate we are having tonight about the plight of Aboriginals….Are we ready to help? Are we ready to do something? Every single one of us, so we don’t do this in another 28 years, so we don’t do this debate in another eight years. That is the question for all of us.”The debate was expected to wrap up at midnight.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

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Google will never sell any personal info to 3rd parties CEO Pichai

first_imgNew York: Google will never sell any personal information of its users to third parties, CEO Sundar Pichai has said, amidst growing global concern over the misuse of personal data by some social media giants. In an opinion piece Tuesday in The New York Times, he also said that privacy cannot be a “luxury good” that is only available to people who can afford to buy premium products and services. The 46-year-old Indian-origin CEO of Google said he believed that privacy was “one of the most important topics of our time.” Also Read – Commercial vehicle sales to remain subdued in current fiscal: Icra People today are rightly concerned about how their information is used and shared, yet they all define privacy in their own ways, he said. “To make privacy real, we give you clear, meaningful choices around your data. All while staying true to two unequivocal policies: that Google will never sell any personal information to third parties; and that you get to decide how your information is used,” Pichai said. Pichai said he has seen this first-hand as he talked to people in different parts of the world. Also Read – Ashok Leyland stock tanks over 5 pc as co plans to suspend production for up to 15 days “To the families using the internet through a shared device, privacy might mean privacy from one another. To the small-business owner who wants to start accepting credit card payments, privacy means keeping customer data secure. To the teenager sharing selfies, privacy could mean the ability to delete that data in the future,” Pichai said. He noted that privacy was personal, which makes it even more vital for companies to give people clear, individual choices around how their data is used. He said legislation will help companies like Google to work toward ensuring that privacy protections are available to more people around the world. “But we’re not waiting for it. We have a responsibility to lead. And we’ll do so in the same spirit we always have, by offering products that make privacy a reality for everyone,” Pichai said. Ideally, privacy legislation would require all businesses to accept responsibility for the impact of their data processing in a way that creates consistent and universal protections for individuals and society as a whole, he said. He said Google has worked hard to continually earn people’s trust by providing accurate answers and keeping their questions private. “We’ve stayed focused on the products and features that make privacy a reality for everyone,” he said in the opinion piece. “For everyone” is a core philosophy for Google; it’s built into our mission to create products that are universally accessible and useful. That’s why Search works the same for everyone, whether you’re a professor at Harvard or a student in rural Indonesia,” he said. “Our mission compels us to take the same approach to privacy. For us, that means privacy cannot be a luxury good offered only to people who can afford to buy premium products and services. Privacy must be equally available to everyone in the world,” Pichai underlined. He noted that even in cases where Google offered a paid product like YouTube Premium, which includes an ads-free experience, the regular version of YouTube has plenty of privacy controls built in. Pichai recalled that last week, Google announced significant new privacy features, including one-click access to privacy settings from all its major products and auto-delete controls that allows one to choose how long the person want data to be saved. “And to protect your data from security threats, we just introduced a security key built into Android phones that can provide two-factor authentication,” he said. In the future, Aritificial Intelligence (AI) will provide even more ways to make products more helpful with less data. With increased spending on digital advertising, Google and Facebook have become forces to reckon with as millions of users, especially from emerging markets like India, go online. But multiple instances of data breaches and user information leaks have brought increased scrutiny on many platforms from regulators and governments across the globe. These companies are now walking a tightrope as they attempt to balance user privacy with increased accountability as governments seek greater disclosures and controls over digital platforms.last_img read more

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Colts Coach Chuck Pagano Sidelined By Leukemia

Indianapolis Colts coach Chuck Pagano, who had complained of fatigue recently, has been diagnosed with leukemia and is expected to be hospitalized six to eight weeks as he undergoes treatment.Team owner Jim Irsay made the announcement Monday during a somber and sometimes emotional news conference at the team complex.“I am optimistic. I feel with every fiber of my body and I know Chuck feels that he can beat this thing,” Irsay said.Offensive coordinator Bruce Arians will serve as the interim coach in Pagano’s absence. Irsay said that Pagano requested that Arians coach the team while he is undergoing treatment.Pagano told ESPN senior NFL analyst Chris Mortensen in a text that he “will be back soon.”Irsay, however, said it was unlikely Pagano would be able to assume full-time coaching duties this year.“I think it’s unlikely he’ll be all-in as the head coach the rest of this season,” Irsay said. “He may be able to come back and be in the press box or something.”Dr. Larry Cripe, the physician treating the coach at Indiana University’s Simon Cancer Center, said Pagano has acute myeloid leukemia, where the bone marrow is producing abnormal white blood cells that interfere with healthy blood cells. Symptoms can include weakness, weight loss and easy bruising or bleeding. Treatments can include chemotherapy, drugs and radiation therapy.Irsay said Pagano’s wife pushed him to see the doctor after noticing unusual bruising on the coach’s body.“He is ready to take this fight on and he is a fighter,” Irsay said.Pagano waited until the Colts’ bye week last week to be checked out after experiencing extreme fatigue and bruising, starting in training camp.Pagano believed he was experiencing football fatigue, but a blood test early last week revealed the diagnosis of leukemia.The initial phase of treatment usually requires a hospital stay of four to five weeks, though Irsay later acknowledged he expected Pagano to be in the hospital at least six weeks.Cripe said Pagano began the “arduous” treatment last week and that many adults do recover from the disease. For now, Pagano is being kept in a “protected” hospital environment where air is filtered and hand-washing is essential.Pagano was admitted last Wednesday evening; the team had a bye this weekend and players and the assistants, other than Arians, were not told Pagano was ill until Monday morning.Cripe said that Pagano is handling the chemotherapy treatments well so far. The goal of the treatment is to “cure” Pagano, which means the disease remains in remission for 3 to 5 years.“This is not an easy day for any of us,” Arians said. “It was not the way I ever dreamed about addressing a group like this. But I know he’ll get through it.”General manager Ryan Grigson said he was not yet certain how the rest of the coaching duties would be split up, though he expected all of the assistants to pitch in.The 51-year-old Pagano was hired in January after serving as the Baltimore Ravens‘ defensive coordinator.Pagano earned his first win Sept. 16 against the Vikings. The Colts (1-2) had a bye last weekend. read more

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Former NFL Receiver Reche Caldwell Arrested For Selling Ecstasy

Reche Caldwell, former NFL receiver, was arrested in Tampa and accused of selling the drug “Ecstasy,” his second arrest in five months. He was released from jail on Wednesday after posting a $2,000 bond. Caldwell faces one felony charge of possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell.Caldwell, 35, was arrested in January for allegedly spearheading an illegal gambling operation in Tampa with two other men. According to jail records, Caldwell has been arrested four times in Tampa since 2009.Prior to Caldwell’s criminal problems, he was standout receiver at the University of Florida, and eventually became a second-round pick by the San Diego Chargers in 2002. Caldwell was an underachiever throughout his career, but he had 760 receiving yards and four touchdowns with the Patriots in 2006. He spent the 2007 season with the Washington Redskins before his career ended.Broncos receiver Andre Caldwell is Reche’s younger brother. Andre Caldwell signed a two-year, $3.45-million deal with the Denver Broncos this offseason. He is expected to move up Denver’s depth chart after Eric Decker’s signing with the New York Jets during free agency. read more

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Pryors flashy legacy on the line with Bucks

For Terrelle Pryor, the Sugar Bowl is bigger than busting Ohio State’s 0-9 slump against the SEC in bowl games or redeeming the Big Ten after its horrid, winless New Year’s Day bowl performance. The junior quarterback’s mental toughness and his ability to fight through adversity will be on display. If he fails to rise to the occasion, it will harm his legacy, something that Pryor speaks so fondly about. In his attempts to rally the spirit of the Buckeye faithful, Pryor has boasted that he’ll get his “jersey hung up” at Ohio Stadium and that he “wants to leave a legacy here.” Apparently whatever legacy of success Pryor has at OSU is neatly displayed on some guy’s mantel, rather than at the Horseshoe. After the public learned of the Buckeye players’ five-game suspensions for improper benefits, including selling awards and receiving discounted tattoos, the legacy of selfish behavior seems to be the only one they’re leaving behind. That’s certainly not what Pryor implied originally. Of course, Pryor is not the only Buckeye guilty of selling out tradition for personal gain, but he obviously is the most prominent of the bunch and the most oft criticized. ESPN analyst Kirk Herbstreit is seemingly Pryor’s most public and outspoken critic. The former Buckeye quarterback ripped Pryor for his sideline demeanor during games, to which Pryor responded by calling Herbstreit a “fake Buckeye” on Twitter. That’s coming from the “true” Buckeye in Pryor — if “true” Buckeyes hock their hard-earned, team-oriented rewards for cash and tattoos. At the end of the day, showcasing your “school pride” with a giant Block “O” tattoo that looks like a 4-year-old scribbled it in crayon doesn’t sound like it’s worth the price to me. That may sound harsh, but it’s tame in comparison to Herbstreit’s blanket statements about Pryor’s award-selling controversy, such as, “You wonder how much involvement he had in this, if he was the ringleader in this.” I, meanwhile, can’t help but wonder why Herbstreit’s obnoxious Byers Auto Group commercials on local TV label him an “MVP quarterback.” Is it his memorable 8-3-1 1992 campaign as OSU’s starter? Is it referring to his legendary days in Centerville’s peewee league? Whatever the case may be, he’s certainly the “MVP” of hyperbole when it comes to trying to prove to college football fans that he’s not a biased Buckeye. If Pryor’s saltiness toward his critics in harsh times is any indication of how he’ll play on the field, it doesn’t look too good. The tweet parade doesn’t stop with Herbstreit, as Pryor even addressed the rumors of getting improper benefits before the suspensions were passed down. “I paid for my tattoos. Go Bucks,” Pryor posted on his personal Twitter feed. That tweet mysteriously and conveniently disappeared a day later. Evidently, he’s taking public relations lessons from his “mentor” LeBron James. In the face of all the criticism, the Sugar Bowl presents an opportunity for OSU and, most importantly, for Pryor. It’s a challenge more demanding than a last-second drive to beat Wisconsin in Madison. Essentially, it’s steeper than any challenge he’s faced in his career. A singular, heroic, final-minute drive defines just a season. How Pryor and his fellow Buckeyes respond to the public backlash will define their entire careers. If Pryor replicates his winning performance from last year’s Rose Bowl and makes good on his promise to return next season, his decaying legacy can be salvaged. OSU currently has a 30-3 record with him as a starter, and that sparkling record on his résumé will stand out even more with a strong end to his career. However, if he’s not able to steer the Buckeyes through its most trying time in the Jim Tressel era, he’s an outcast, much like Herbstreit appears to be within the Buckeye community. Starting with this Sugar Bowl, we will find out if Pryor’s closer to Archie Griffin or Maurice Clarett in OSU lore. If there’s one thing I’ve learned about the nimble-footed quarterback, however, it’s not to count him out when the weight of the world is seemingly on his shoulders. Look no further than the fourth-and-10 against Iowa earlier this season. read more

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Opinion European soccer could be next big thing for American fans

Manchester United’s Juan Mata, left, and the Los Angeles Galaxy’s Gyasi Zardes fight for the ball in an exhibition game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif., on July 23. Manchester won, 7-0.Credit: Courtesy of MCTAmerican sports fans are always looking for the next big thing.With a number of sports trying to leave their mark over the years, soccer has seemed destined to lag behind, with legions of fans and media types wondering when it will finally reach mainstream popularity in America.They can stop wondering.Some may credit this summer’s highly-entertaining World Cup in Brazil, which featured the world’s biggest stars Lionel Messi, Cristiano Ronaldo and Neymar, its share of villains, like Luis Suarez and his bite or Arjen Robben and flopping, and the advantage of being one of two sporting events that the world turns to collectively.But for the college-aged generation and younger, soccer has been a premier and attractive sport for much longer than people without a finger on the pulse realize.Recognizing this, some of the top European clubs have flocked to America for matches that, despite the fact that they amount to what the preseason is for the NFL, are thrilling for fans. It is a perfect business model for European clubs: they see a growing market and realize they can provide a superior product than the hometown teams can.Manchester United, the most historically successful, and hated, club of the English Premier League, went on a preseason tour of the U.S. that began with a match against the L.A. Galaxy in July. The 84,362 fans in attendance at the Rose Bowl witnessed a thorough drubbing by United, who dropped the Galaxy 7-0 in a match that certainly did no good for the MLS.As part of the 2014 International Champions Cup — technically a tournament, although it is really only friendlies for the European clubs — United also took on Italian notables Roma and Inter Milan –– getting a victory and a draw, respectively –– before the big one: a showdown with Real Madrid in Ann Arbor, Mich.Real, of Spain’s La Liga, have an embarrassment of riches. The club team of not only one of the most famous athletes in the world in Ronaldo, Madrid’s confines are also home to too many superstars to list. Their match against Manchester United was hotly anticipated, and it came as no surprise that it set the record for the largest turnout for a soccer contest in America.A 3-1 final score in favor of Manchester left the mostly red-clad crowd satisfied, and although it had been declared he would not play, the subbing in of Ronaldo for the final twenty minutes had the crowd in hysterics.With that win, Manchester United advanced to the final of the tournamentUnited took the title from Liverpool, another English club team on a U.S. tour, 3-1.Liverpool’s most notable game stateside was a contest against reigning Premier League champions Manchester City –– a victory for Liverpool played at Yankee Stadium. Attendance fell just below 50,000, more than it has been for any Yankee game this season.The teams playing these friendlies in America are not here for simple preseason warm ups. Their brand is expanding to America, and these clubs want to be here now that they see America as a cash cow. Manchester United is worth $2.81 billion, and they didn’t get there by isolating themselves — their marketing and reputation has turned them into possibly the best known sports organization in the world. Four of the top 10 most valuable franchises are European soccer clubs, with Real Madrid weighing in at $3.44 billion.With English and Spanish teams showcasing their talents in the U.S., they remind us that there is not much reason to give much thought to Major League Soccer. The best team in MLS looked totally outclassed in their match with United. Add that to the fact that Manchester was playing more than 5,000 miles from home, and the embarrassment keeps mounting for the Galaxy.We need to let go of the belief that MLS needs to be popular for soccer to make its mark in America. The best players in the world play elsewhere and fans have no interest in watching something that is not world class — it is the same reason we don’t care about Minor League Baseball or the Canadian Football League.The game at Michigan Stadium is definite proof that European soccer has reached its highest level of fandom, a level that MLS may never come close to. Two foreign clubs squared off in the largest stadium in the country, and filled it to near capacity.Maybe someday MLS will improve enough to be popular in America. For now though, American fans are content just watching Ronaldo warm up. read more

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Man City bid for stake in Doan rejected by Groningen

first_imgThe Premier League side are not the only club who have noticed the Japan teen and his rise to stardom. However, his current club Groningen rejected their offer to split him with the Citizens.The Dutch team’s technical director, Ron Jans, recently confirmed Manchester City had a lucrative offer to take part ownership of the 19-years-old as soon as his loan deal with Gamba Osaka was ratified this week. However, he also confirmed the offer was rejected.Doan has played a key part this season for his team as he has been able to score eight goals and three assists – a player of that rank is certainly out of Groningen’s pocket. The Citizens have made a kind gesture in their offer to help them acquire him more easily, but the Dutch have decided they will be doing it on their own.norwich city, manchester city, premier leagueReport: City are stunned by Norwich George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Manchester City was stunned by Norwich City in todays Premier League clash.Much has been made in recent days of the potential impact of Aymeric…“We said that we really liked it that they offered it, but we’re doing it on our own. The connection with City is very positive,” Jans admitted, according to Goal.Doan has not made his first appearance for the Japan international team yet, but will most likely help them in Russia.last_img read more

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Ferdinand slammed Jones for his penalty tackle

first_imgChelsea won the FA Cup final against Manchester United 1-0 thanks to Eden Hazard’s converted penalty and this decisive moment of the game was caused by silly Phil Jones’ challenge in the penalty box.Rio Ferdinand believes that the decision of Phil Jones was completely wrong and he misread the whole situation in the penalty area as he tackled Eden Hazard way too late – and this was the moment that decided the whole game.The former United centre-back spoke about the penalty situation as he said, according to 101 Great Goals:“Jones gets himself in a pickle from start to finish.”“Here his body position is all wrong, he’s the wrong side in terms of facing the opponent.”harry maguire, manchester UnitedMaguire says United need to build on today’s win George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Harry Maguire wants his United teammates to build on the victory over Leicester City.During the summer, Harry Maguire was referred to as the ultimate…“He doesn’t know where Eden Hazard is, that’s his biggest problem.”“Then once he reacts the touch is that good and he’s that quick, and at this world-class level he’s panicking, he’s in turmoil.”“But here, once he releases he can’t win the ball there, turn and face your goal.”“Run towards your goal. Don’t gamble that you’re going to nick it in front of Hazard, he’s too quickly.”“Run towards goal and make the recovery and be in-between the goal and the ball.”last_img read more

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In Loving Memory Ellen Amelia Jolly Howell MBE

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp 500 in Five Cays get Healthy Big Breakfast Related Items:Ellen Amelia Jolly Howell, enid capron, osetta jolly Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 13 Mar 2015 – It is International Women’s Week and in keeping with the spirit of the commemoration; we thought to tell you about an educator whom we lost last week but whose name is not at all strange; especially on the island of Providenciales. Life for this early childhood lifelong educator did not begin in Provo, it started in North Caicos. She was born on July 13th 1937, Ellen Amelia Jolly and grew up in the quiet community of South Winsor, in the settlement of Bottle Creek, North Caicos with her parents Violet Oseta Jolly, who was once a Higgs and Eric Emmanuel Jolly. Ellen has an amazing story and believe it or not, the journey toward her professional career as a teacher began at the tender age of 14. One of her sons, the respected Rev. Dr. Conrad Howell shared with me that his mother returned to Bottle Creek, after a teachers’ course in Grand Turk and then moved to Provo to work as an assistant teacher. At the time there were only three teachers working at the school. Ellen worked with education celebrities… her mother Oseta Jolly and namesake for the Five Cays Primary School, Enid Capron. She married one too… her husband: Clement Howell. It took a little wooing by young Howell, but eventually the crooner and educator himself got his girl; they were married at Bethany Baptist Church on January 6th, 1957 and had nine children: “God permitted them to raise eight – five sons and three daughters.” She was honored with many awards including a Member of the British Empire in 2001. She is called an industrious woman, who loved her husband and her family; a Christian saved since 1956 and spending over 40 years in the teaching profession. Among her other relatives: Education Director: Edgar Howell, her son; Education Officer: Tamera Robinson, her daughter; Point Grace Resort General Manager: Beverly Williams, her daughter and Judymae Knowles, teacher and Gospel music minister, her sister. To the family of Ellen Amelia Jolly Howell, sincerest condolences…. Her funeral is this Saturday at Bethany Baptist Church in Blue Hills. Mrs. Howell was 77 years old when she died. Enid Capron Student To Star In A Public Service Announcement Recommended for you Earth Day underwater Clean-up & Tree plantinglast_img read more

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