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BAHAMAS Viana Gardiner Heads OPM Deliverables Unit

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, January 22, 2018 – Nassau – Counsel and Attorney-at-Law, Mrs. Viana Gardiner has been appointed head of the Deliverables Unit in the Office of the Prime Minister.  The announcement was made by Anthony Newbold, Press Secretary, Office of the Prime Minister during his regular Tuesday Press Briefing at the Cecil V. Wallace-Whitfield Centre, West Bay Street.The appointment of Mrs. Gardiner fulfills a promise made by Prime Minister, Dr. the Hon. Hubert A. Minnis in the last quarter of 2017, to promote good governance and accountability within the various government ministries, agencies, departments and corporations, through the establishment of a Deliverables Unit.The Deliverables Unit will be responsible for tracking projects and initiatives set out and agreed to by the Prime Minister, and establishing timelines for the completion of such projects. The Unit will do the same for projects of various ministers and ministries.  The Deliverables Unit will also assist in the Prime Minister’s push towards a greater “Ease of Doing Business” in The Bahamas.A member of the Board of Directors of The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and Employers’ Confederation, Ms. Gardiner co-chairs the BCCEC’s Ease of Doing Business Division.Press Secretary Newbold said Ms. Gardiner brings a wealth of experience to her new position, having previously served as Director of Trade for the Government of The Bahamas.  In that position, she had carriage of the Government’s international trade policy and promotion including matters related to the Government’s bid to accede to the World Trade Organization (WTO); implementation of the Economic Partnership Agreement between CARIFORUM and the European Union and negotiation of a successor agreement to CARIBCAN. Ms. Gardiner also had responsibility for industry and manufacturing development.Ms. Gardiner currently serves as Deputy Chief of The Bahamas Trade Commission and has previously served as Acting Director of Investments with the Bahamas Investment Authority, Office of the Prime Minister, where she was tasked with the responsibility for encouraging and facilitating foreign direct investments into The Bahamas and investment policy development and promotions.Ms. Gardiner has also previously served as Secretary/Vice Consul to The Bahamas’ High Commission to Canada with emphasis on trade, investment and commercial matters.Release: BISlast_img read more

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10 Things To Know For Wednesday

first_img Share AP Photo/Eugene HoshikoU.S. Vice President Mike Pence, front, waves to U.S. servicemen and Japanese Self-Defense Forces personnel on the flight deck of U.S. navy nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan, at the U.S. Navy’s Yokosuka base in Yokosuka, south of Tokyo, Wednesday, April 19, 2017.1. GEORGIA HOUSE SEAT STILL UNDECIDEDA June 20 runoff between Democrat Jon Ossoff and Republican Karen Handel is an early barometer for Trump and both parties ahead of the 2018 midterm elections.2. ‘THE SHIELD STANDS GUARD AND THE SWORD STANDS READY’From the deck of a massive aircraft carrier off Tokyo, Vice President Mike Pence warns North Korea not to test the resolve of the U.S. military.3. TRUMP SHAKING UP STATUS-QUO IN NORTH ASIAIn trying to get North Korea to abandon its nuclear weapons and ballistic missile programs, Pyongyang sees more volatility, China calls for calm and Japan weighs a retaliatory capability.4. WHAT MAY HAVE MOTIVATED FRESNO SHOOTERBefore he shot to death three people at random, Kori Ali Muhammad, a 34-year-old black man, told police he wanted to kill as many white people as he could before he was captured.5. MANHUNT ENDS IN UNLIKELY FASHIONFacebook slaying suspect Steve Stephens was undone when a worker at a McDonald’s near Erie, Pennsylvania, recognized him at the drive-thru window.6. WHERE TRUMP SUPPORT IS STRONGResidents of Androscoggin County, Maine, backed a Republican for president for the first time in decades because many support his views on immigration, AP finds, even though the town has been bolstered by immigrants.7. AP: PERU BACKSLIDING ON ILLEGAL LOGGINGThe 2015 impoundment of a freighter in Houston carrying tons of Amazon rainforest wood represents a rare victory in the battle to preserve tropical forests.8. HOW NAVY IS ADDRESSING FEMALE SAILORSDefense contractor Electric Boat is designing what will be the first U.S. fleet of Navy submarines built specifically to accommodate female crew members.9. NO SPINNING THIS ONEViewership of Fox News Channel’s “O’Reilly Factor” drops without its vacationing and scandal-riddled host, Bill O’Reilly.10. WHO’S WONDERING WHETHER HE’LL ‘GET THAT ITCH AGAIN’Michael Phelps hasn’t gotten the urge to return to swimming, but the winningest athlete in Olympic history hasn’t ruled out yet another comeback.last_img read more

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Plants live die according to their size

first_imgPlants self-regulate their populations to maintain stability and optimize their lives, with the lengths of their lives directly related to their mass, a recent study has found. Further, a single scaling power for lifespan holds true across the entire spectrum of plants, from single-celled phototrophs to giant redwoods. Citation: Plants live, die according to their size (2007, October 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-10-die-size.html “Plant metabolism increases with increasing temperature, and, thus, plant life span and birth and mortality rates are expected to increase with temperature as well,” explained Marbà. “Hence, global warming may have consequences for the stability of plant populations. If temperature increases mortality and birth rates equally, plant populations will turn over faster but they would remain stable. Otherwise, plant populations will decline. In any case, a faster plant turnover, coupled with higher metabolic rates of decomposing microorganims with warming, may lead to a reduction in the CO2 sink capacity of vegetation.”Despite the delicate balance between mortality and birth rates, the actual mechanisms governing plant life and death are still unclear to biologists. Most certainly, controls include an assortment of metabolic processes interacting at all levels, from molecular to organismal, and include respiration, reproduction, cellular damage, and structural imbalances. Because plants, unlike animals, retain their reproductive capacity throughout their lives, evolution might put greater selective pressure on plants’ lifespans. The researchers plan to continue investigating how these processes combine to influence plant life histories. Citation: Marbà, Núria, Duarte, Carlos M., and Agustí, Susana. “Allometric scaling of plant life history.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, October 2, 2007, vol. 104, no. 40, 15777-15780.Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Mortality and birth rates are nearly identical for all plants, keeping their populations stable. Credit: Núria Marbà, et al. ©2007 PNAS. Scientists have long known that animals’ lifespans are closely scaled to the species’ body size, with elephants living longer than mice. But while plant biologists have predicted such a connection in plants, a full study has never been performed until now.Researchers Núria Marbà, Carlos Duarte and Susana Agustí at the Mediterranan Institute for Advanced Studies—a joint institute between the CSIC (Spanish Council for Scientific Research) and the University of the Balearic Islands in Esporles, Spain—have recently examined more than 1,000 reports of plant birth and mortality rates across a wide spectrum of species, discovering that the connection holds with extreme precision.The researchers found that both population mortality rates and population birth rates of all plant species scale as the –¼ power of plant mass. In other words, the smaller a plant, the higher its mortality and birth rates, meaning the shorter its lifespan. Hence, plant lifespan scales as almost exactly the ¼ power of plant mass. “The functioning of biological systems depends to a large extent on their metabolism, i.e., on how they process energy and materials, such as light, water, and nutrients,” Marbà explained to PhysOrg.com. “Small plants require fewer resources per unit of time than large ones, and, therefore, they are able to turn over the individuals of their populations faster than large plants. As plant size increases, more resources and time are needed to produce a fully grown individual, and thus their lifespan increases, resulting in small plants having shorter life spans than larger ones.”An interesting aspect of these relationships is that mortality and birth rates are nearly identical within a species, keeping the population extremely stable. Nature has additional reasons for this perfect balance, too, which include stabilizing carbon cycling, optimizing plant life histories, and stabilizing the ecosystems the plants inhabit. The scientists suggest that, to achieve this balance, plant mortality rates have evolved to match the birth rates.The group also investigated whether temperature entered the equation. According to the metabolic theory of ecology, metabolic rates (which determine lifespan) should be temperature-dependent. However, the researchers found that, unlike animals, plants’ mortality and birth rates are independent of temperature, or at least within the variation of their data. This finding contrasts with previous evidence that mortality rates of phytoplankton, macroalgae, and land plants increase with increasing temperature when the response of single species to temperature is examined. The researchers explain that resolving this issue could have a fundamental impact on predictions of global warming. center_img Live fast and die young, or play the long game? Scientists map 121 animal life cycles Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Researchers engineer molecular magnets to act as longlived qubits

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — Some physicists today are investigating the possibility of using molecular magnets as information storage units in future quantum computers. Molecular magnets are molecules whose magnetic moments prefer to lie along a particular axis with respect to the molecular structure. They have electron spin structures that can be magnetically tuned to more than one state and, at low temperatures, can retain this state even in the absence of a magnetic field, potentially allowing them to store information. More information: C.J. Wedge, et al. “Chemical Engineering of Molecular Qubits.” PRL 108, 107204 (2012). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.107204 Chemical structure of a molecular magnet. Image credit: C.J. Wedge, et al. ©2012 American Physical Society Copyright 2012 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Researchers engineer molecular magnets to act as long-lived qubits (2012, March 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-03-molecular-magnets-long-lived-qubits.html Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Breakthrough in quantum computing: Resisting ‘quantum bug’ Now a team of researchers from the UK have demonstrated that the phase of quantum mechanical superpositions between the magnetic states can last for more than 15 microseconds, allowing their spin states to be repeatedly switched before they lose their information through decoherence. This finding adds to the evidence that molecular magnets may be useful as qubits, the components of a quantum computer.The researchers, C.J. Wedge, et al., from the University of Oxford and the University of Manchester, have published their study on how to chemically engineer molecular qubits to increase their phase memory times in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters. Previously, the researchers achieved a phase memory time of 3.8 microseconds, and studies of other molecular magnet systems have yielded times on the 1 microsecond time scale.  “Phase memory time and coherence time are very similar concepts,” coauthor Arzhang Ardavan of the University of Oxford told PhysOrg.com. “[Long phase memory time] means that it is possible to manipulate the qubit many times before the quantum information is lost. That is the greatest significance, but we were also pleased that it was possible to control the molecular structures precisely so as to determine the various decoherence mechanisms and to reduce them as far as we were able.”In their study, the researchers focused on Cr7Ni molecular magnets, which they had previously shown to have  coherence times that greatly exceed the 10 nanoseconds needed for single-qubit manipulations. Here, they have taken the next steps and investigated the specific sources of the molecular magnet’s decoherence (nuclear spin diffusion and spectral diffusion), as well as how to optimize the structures to delay decoherence as long as possible.To do this, the researchers compared different Cr7Ni structures by changing two key components, certain cations and ligands. They specifically investigated how well the different structures retained their spin states at low temperatures, as measured by the structures’ phase-coherence relaxation time. The researchers found that optimally engineered Cr7Ni molecular magnets can have phase memory times exceeding 15 microseconds, which is several orders of magnitude higher than the time required for single-qubit manipulations, and significantly longer than previous demonstrations.The researchers predict that the results will lead to the ability to manipulate quantum states within molecular magnet clusters. They plan to further investigate ways to manipulate molecular magnets in the future.“We will examine various possibilities,” Ardavan said. “Our collaborators who work on the chemistry of these molecules are able to synthesize structures incorporating several coupled molecular magnets. We will work on simple multi-qubit algorithms using these kinds of molecules. “Recently, it was proposed theoretically that electric fields could be used to manipulate the magnetic states of molecular magnets,” he added. “We are examining these possibilities experimentally.”last_img read more

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